Segmentation & Personas

Archetype Analysis

What is it?

The Myers–Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment is a psychometric questionnaire designed to measure psychological preferences in how people perceive the world and make decisions. Katharine Cook Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers based their model on an extrapolation from the theories proposed by Carl Gustav Jung’s 1921 book Psychological Types.

After answering a series of questions people are then characterised into a number of personality types which take account of such factors as whether they are introverts or extroverts, whether they approach problems intellectually or emotionally etc. In the finally analysis people are then grouped into one of 16 different personality types that behave and think differently.

What’s the benefit of it?

It allows us to explore how different personalities respond differently to products, brands and concepts. We can, for example, look at people who buy a particular type of product or customers of a particular brand – by understanding which personality types are most strongly attracted to a brand or product we can understand how best to promote it to these particular groups.

In short, by understanding the mix of archetypes you need to target, you will then also understand more about the kind of messaging you need to develop to appeal to the way they think and feel.

When you might use it?

Use it to understand how different types of consumers respond differently & how best to tailor your messaging to suit the psychological profile of the audience.

You may wish to consider a different approach to segmentation if you wish to explore factors aside from personality types within the context of developing meaningful segments.

Cluster Analysis/Needs Based Segmentation

What is it?

Traditionally marketers have used basic demographic information to define segments – such as age, gender, region for consumers or business size, job title and industry for businesses. However, such classifications go only so far in defining behaviour (and sometimes do not really explain behaviour at all).

There are many other factors that might explain consumer behaviour that are unrelated to someone’s age and gender. For example, their attitude to technology, how they like to consume information, whether they like to stand out from the crowd or run with the herd, and so on.

Sometimes it is better to define segments based on consumer needs – i.e. the things they want, the things that appeal to them, the media they like and so on.

Cluster analysis is a statistical toolkit for creating needs based segments. We begin by asking a wide range of questions about consumer behaviour and attitudes. We then analyse this data set to identify “clusters” (i.e. groups of people whose answers follow a similar pattern).

What’s the benefit of it?

It gives us a segmentation of the market based on different consumer needs and tell us how best each segment can be approached and what kind of messages are likely to work best with which types of consumers.

When you might use it?

  • To get a better understanding of your market
  • To help developed more targeted marketing messages
  • To help tailor your offering and present it in a form that is more appealing to particular customer groups
  • Personalise your message to target specific groups of consumers based on their actual needs and the types of media they use

Persona Development

What is it?

Persona development can be used to develop exciting content for a marketing campaign, demonstrate thought leadership, or develop rich profiles of different types of consumers to impress your clients or business partners.

Traditionally marketers have used basic demographic information to define consumer personas – such as age, gender, region for consumers or business size, job title and industry for businesses. However, such classifications can be fairly bland and unexciting and may not actually help explain consumer behaviour at all.

There are other ways of painting a picture of a consumer aside from someone’s age and gender. For example, their hobbies, their attitudes to technology, how extrovert they are, the media they like, their attitude to advertising etc. There’s no real limit to the number of different factors that help us paint an engaging picture of who consumers are and what they really want.

We can develop consumer personas by exploring these kind of issues by asking a wide range of questions about behaviour and attitudes. We then analyse this data set to identify “persona groups” (i.e. groups of people whose answers follow a similar pattern and who might be classed together as having the same “persona”).

What’s the benefit of it?

Used to develop rich, meaningful, portraits of consumer groups based on behaviour, interests, hobbies and different personality traits.

When you might use it?

  • To develop content to use in marketing
  • As a basis for an interesting feature article in a magazine or newspaper
  • To help understand your customers and developed more tailored marketing to target specific persona types you identify as important.
We are ready to help you

I’d just like to take this opportunity to express my immense gratitude to the entire team at Redshift for all their outstanding work over the past ten series of the show. I know that some of our requests have been quite trying at times, but no matter where we set the bar, you guys were always able to clear it by miles. So please could you pass my thanks onto your fantastic team.

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Questionnaire Design:

Keep the number of questions to a minimum to ensure highest possible data quality